Tech Twin to Join NCDA Board

As someone who has served on NCDA’s board for a couple of stints, I (Deb) can say what a tremendous honor it is to be a part of a team responsible for guiding the future of our profession. I am so pleased to learn and now share that my tech twin, Melissa, will be joining the NCDA Board in October! I’m sure she’ll keep the board advised of all the tech trends that might help to extend and enhance career development for all. CONGRATS MELISSA!!!

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Adding Infographics to Your Online Career Resources

We were thrilled to present at this year’s National Career Development Association (NCDA) conference. As promised, our full slide presentation is now available below.

Learn how to make engaging and informative graphics for your websites, workshops, and online resource pages! Free web-based tools make it easy to create professional products with no previous design experience. This session explores the options, shares good and bad examples, and provides a walk through of infographic creation using Piktochart.

Thanks to all who attended the event for their feedback, participation, and ideas!

Infographics! at NCDA 2017

Are you planning to attend the National Career Development Association’s 2017 conference? We will be there this month with a session titled “The Positive Impact of Adding Infographics to Your Online Career Resources.”

If you won’t make it to NCDA this year, follow the official #NCDAorlando hashtag for more info and shared conversations during the event.

**Our full slide presentation is now available here.**

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The Future of Jobs – Report Review

I’m still pouring over research discovered several months ago during a collaborative writing project with Lynn Atanasoff, a distance career counselor at Penn State World Campus. Lynn and I were reading about the effects of technology on not only the work we do, but also our health. Terms like technostress and telepressure filled our fall and spring, and we are proud to have a related article in press with Career Development Quarterly, but I digress …

Future of Jobs

A 2016 report from the World Economic Forum (WEF), The Future of Jobs: Employment, Skills, and Workforce Strategy for the Fourth Industrial Revolution [PDF], takes a global look at “… developments in genetics, 3D printing and biotechnology, … [which] are all building on and amplifying one another.” As the authors state, “While the impending change holds great promise, the patterns of consumption, production and employment created by it also pose major challenges requiring proactive adaptation by corporations, governments and individuals.”

What is the potential role for career practitioners in this revolution? “By evaluating the future labor market from the perspective of some of the world’s largest employers [WEF] hopes to improve the current stock of knowledge around anticipated skills needs, recruitment patterns and occupational requirements.” Having a better awareness of the future of jobs, and the dynamic nature of technology-related changes, is a good place to start.

This report is long (167 pages), but well organized including helpful data visualization elements throughout. I encourage you to browse WEF’s findings through a survey of senior human resources and strategy executives representing nine industry sectors and 15 regional economic areas.

A few highlights…

Top-rated demographic and socio-economic drivers of change:

  • Changing work environments and flexible working arrangements (44%)
  • Rise of the middle class in emerging markets (23%)
  • Climate change, natural resource constraints and the transition to a greener economy (23%)

Top-rated technological drivers of change:

  • Mobile internet and cloud technology (34%)
  • Advances in computing power and big data (26%)
  • New energy supplies and technologies (22%)

Top-growing in-demand skills across industries:

  • Cognitive abilities – e.g., creativity, logical reasoning, visualization
  • Systems skills – e.g., judgement, decision-making, analysis
  • Complex problem solving – e.g., solving ill-defined problems in real-world settings
  • Content skills – e.g., active learning, communication, computer literacy

See page 21 for more information and a helpful graphic – based on O*Net – that breaks down abilities, basic skills and cross-functional skill sets into categories, e.g., social, systems, complex problem solving, resource management, technical.

Explore the report in more detail to discover implications specific to the industries and clients you may serve, and consider sharing with colleagues in your career center or office.

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Linking Online Resources to Innovative Career Counseling Approaches

I’m very excited about continuing the conversation about how technology can be used in creative ways to enhance career counseling interventions and job searching. This presentation was made at the Ohio Career Development Association, co-sponsored by the National Career Development Association. This presentation is a mashup of previous Tech Twins presentations, updated with ethics, as well as a few new features hot off the presses. Hope you enjoy!